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Thursday, May 31, 2012

The Elders - Looking For The Answer (1971 us, pleasant funky psych rock, Gear Fab release)



The Elders were a great band from the Dayton, Ohio area thai formed out of Ihe ashes of Jerry & The Others . Their only recorded legacy came as one of the cuts on the album "WONE". The Dayton Scene (Prism PR-1966). which showcased the top twelve groups from the ONE-sponsored three-day Daytontan battle of the bands in 1966. The song was titled "Don't Cry To Me" and was penned by guitarist Robert Budeliney.
by Roger Maglio


Tracks
1. Looking For The Answer (R. Skinner, L. Bari) - 5:01
2. Too Late To Change (P. Smith, G. Neal) - 4:11
3. Sissy Strut (Modeliste, Neville, Nocentelli, Porter) - 3:58
4. Fort Lauderdale (P. Smith} - 0:59
5. 25 Miles (Starr, Bristol, Suqua, Hatcher, Russell, Wexler) - 3:32
6. By The Size Of My Shoes (Weiss, Williams) - 3:15
7. Everybody Say Yeah (To The Call, Freedom For All),(Budeliney, Neal, Bari) - 3:21
8. Hip Hug Her (Cropper, Jones, Jackson, Dunn) - 3:25
 9. Your Mother Chews Tobacco (Smith) - 1:04

The Elders 
*Jerry Behring- Bass
*Rod Budeliney- Rhythm Guitar
*Ron Skinner- Drums
*Pat Smith- Keyboards

Free Text
Free Text II

11 comments:

Remy said...

Thanks Marios. I've only heard the sample but the funky groove reminds me of the James Gang. I believe like Texas and Michigan, Ohio rock had it's own distinctive flavor.

kobilica said...

MARIOS,you made my day with this one.I've been looking this album in flac for years,bacause my mp3 copy sounds very thin.To me is an overlooked hidden treasure.Extra thanks...

mscmichael said...

Thanks a lot...

ter-jack said...

Marios; This is a great surprise. The band I was in at the time (we're on that WONE comp too) shared gigs with these guys occasionally and they were as good as The McCoys or The Dantes any of the signed Ohio bands that played the dance hall circuit. I had always heard they cut some stuff for Dunhill, but had never heard it. Maybe someone can tell me if these are those tracks.
ter-jack

Philipp said...

Thank you so much, Marios! You have the best web-page for music of the 60's & 70's!

Anonymous said...

Stylistically this is a long way from the garage sound of "Don't Cry To Me"

juan manuel muñoz said...

many thanks

adamus67 said...

Wow...At last!
Long time I had to be satisfied with poor quality rip vinyl of the album, which blended driving guitar and organ with late flower pop
Thanks to Marios for this share ... now my ears has fully satisfied!

Seldom seen killer Psych, Rock, Soul, Funk LP out of Dayton, Ohio. The group where originally known as 'Jerry And The Others'. In 1966 they recorded one song on the 'Dayton Scene' LP, 'Don't You Lie To Me', that has gained collector fame as one of the great teen garage numbers from the area. They became 'The Elders' in 1970, along the way picking up 'Ron Skinner' who previously played with 'The Pictorian Skiffuls'. In 1971 they issued their sole album, 'Looking For The Answer'. Despite what has been written (no flowery psych here), musically their sound is a style of funky rock with influences of Sly & The Family Stone, James Gang, The Young Rascals, Wilson Pickett, and The Meters (whom the cover here, Sissy Strut), highlighted with a combination of driving guitar and (to a lesser extent) organ. Four out of the ten tracks are covers (Sissy Strut / Hip Hugger / 25 Miles) and the originals are decent. Driving guitars, organ & drums plus great vocalist etc...
When you see the cover of their album from 1971. you'd probably expect a fierce hard rock riffs, maybe a little bit in the style of Black Sabbath, because the cover has a skull which stands on an open book - probably in the laboratory of an alchemist searching for the elixir of eternal life, who knows. But when the album starts and the notes dance, surprise is following. No, not at all as it seems, there is no dark Sabbath riffs, but very playful soul rock, with plenty of wah wah guitar (which makes them close to Sly & the Family Stone), and funky rhythms that push the body to move.
Although the beginnings of the group go back to 1965/66 in the garage rock band Jerry and the Others, the first LP wasn’t recorded until 1971, after they changed their name to The Elders. River of musical evolution is always in a hurry ahead, and with that fact in mind I have to admit that they sound a bit delayed because their sound is more fit in 1968 – but is certainly not an negative criticism. After all, there are so many good bands in a backward stage of development of music.

filldemontgat said...

Re up

Many thanks Marios

Marios said...

......The..Elders....Up......

Morgonzo said...

I just found this Lp at a local Goodwill Thrift store here in GA USA for one dollar! The Meters cover is actually a song called Look-Ka Py Py. Cissy Strut is a different song entirely, so the LP is Mis-labeled.
Great Record so far!